My Dog Humps Too Much!

Yes, we know how embarrassing it can be when your dog humps too much. And no, it’s not because your dog is horny. While some humping is sexual in nature, most of the time humping too much doesn’t actually involve any element of sex.
By Pets Team
Published on Thursday, 28 October 2010

Yes, we know how embarrassing it can be when your dog humps too much. And no, it’s not because your dog is horny. While some humping is sexual in nature, most of the time humping too much doesn’t actually involve any element of sex.

Experts say, most of of the time, humping is actually a show of dominance and letting another dog or human know who’s in charge. When it comes to procreation, dogs will definitely know the difference between a human leg and a member of the opposite sex. However, when a stuffed animal or couch pillow becomes the object of your dog’s affections, it’s highly likely that your dog is simply overexcited and over-stimulated.

Dr Mary Burch from the American Kennel Club advises teaching your dog some basic obedience commands like “sit”, “down”, and “stay” as this will help you manage your dog’s behaviour better. Training is a very crucial process when dealing with excessive humping because it will show your dog who’s really in charge – you or him? Humping is a display of authority and dominance and training lets you show him that you’re the top dog.

Redirecting your dog’s attention may work as well – proving him with toys or balls or a quick game of “fetch” will help distract your dog and break the chain of behaviour before it becomes habitual. If your dog is very attached to a particular toy and plays with is inappropriately, you could remove the toy from his environment until his behaviour becomes more manageable.

However, if your dog insists in humping your visitors, avoid yelling at your dog and advise your visitors to make as little fuss as possible. Negative reinforcement of this behaviour will help your dog lessen his humping tendencies. Should you have important visitors coming over, perhaps it would be wise to keep your dog in a separate room.

Dr Mary Burch also adds:

It is true that neutering can reduce or prevent humping, although if humping has become a habit, neutering may have a limited effect. Also keep in mind that in male dogs humping can sometimes be a sign of a physical problem like prostate trouble, and in both males and females, humping can occur due to irritation or infection. If you think this could be the case, get your dog checked out by your veterinarian to be sure.

Do you face problems like these? Write in to our experts or leave a comment below!